NEISSERIA GONORRHOEAE CULTURE

Most specimens submitted to WPHL for gonorrhoeae (GC) are tested using a Nucelic Acid Amplification Test technology (See NAAT Testing for Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae).  There are scenarios when a culture is preferred, particularly when penicillin resistance needs to be determined.

 

TYPE OF TEST

Isolates are identified using two different identification platforms, 16s rDNA Sequence, and API-NH for biochemicals.  A third identification platform, Nucleic Acid Amplification, may be used also.  Isolates that are non-viable, having died in transit, can only be identified by 16s rDNA sequence.

SPECIMEN REQUIREMENTS

Specimens for culture should be submitted on Chocolate Agar or MTM (modified Thayer-Martin) agar plates after 18-24 hours of incubation in 5% CO2 at 35-37° C. Specimens may also be submitted for culture using Amies Charcoal Transport Swabs. These swabs should be received by the laboratory within 24 hours of collection. Note the hours of incubation or collection on the WPHL rest request form.  Samples being shipped in the mail, or courier, should be packed accordingly, taking into account for weather conditions, and time of year.

 

SHIPPING REQUIREMENTS

Specimens that are being submitted on plates, or tubed media, should be shipped to prevent them from being broken in the mail or courier service, and shipped as diagnostic specimens. Complete and enclose WPHL test request form.  Please indicate the site of collection on the test request form. i.e., vaginal, urethral, phayrngeal, etc.

 

DAYS TEST PERFORMED

Daily, Monday – Friday.

RESULTS AVAILABLE

Upon completion of test.

 

REPORTING & INTERPRETATION

Negative culture specimens will be reported as “No Neisseria gonorrhoeae identified or isolated”.

Positve culture specimens will be reported as “Neisseria gonorrhoeae confirmed".  Testing for Beta-lactamase will be done and reported as positive or negative.  Beta lactamase is the enzyme that breaks down penicillin and renders it inactive, making penicillin a poor treatment choice.

ADDITIONAL COMMENTS

  

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